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Health and wellbeing

Health and wellbeing

First three months

Whatever the breed, all puppies develop in the same way; they pass through the same stages from infancy to maturity. Not only is it interesting for you to know about these stages, it is also important that you should be aware of what your puppy is capable of at any particular time of his life.

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Bringing your puppy home

You've chosen your new puppy, said your 'goodbyes' to the breeder and your puppy's remaining family, and you're heading for home. Hopefully, the excitement at the prospect of bringing your new companion home hasn't made you forget to make some important preparations.

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Feeding your puppy

And so is his first food.For the first few days, give your puppy the food that his breeder has been feeding him.

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Meet the vet

One of the first things you'll need to do once you bring your puppy home is make a vet's appointment. But how do you find a vet who's right for you? Recommendations from family and friends can be helpful but, in the absence of those, you'll need to trust your instincts.

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Is your garden safe for your puppy?

Your garden should be a safe, fun haven for the whole family, and that includes your cuddly new puppy. Many commonplace garden products can be dangerous and sometimes fatal to dogs. Slug pellets are especially toxic, as are several weed killers, so please, read the instructions carefully and above all, keep these products well out of reach of your pet.

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Looking after your puppy's pearly whites

By three to four weeks of age your puppy’s temporary teeth, or milk teeth, will start to come through. They have 28 milk teeth in total. At around 3-4 months the milk teeth will start to come loose and fall out.

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All you need to know about neutering

Neutering is by far the best thing you can do for your puppy. Here's why: If you're the proud owner of a female puppy, you'll be interested to hear that spaying can reduce her chances of developing breast cancer, uterine cancer and ovarian cancer.

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6 months health check

At six months, it is advisable to make a vet’s appointment for your puppy so they can provide a thorough health-check. Your vet will want to make sure your puppy is on track with his development and growth, so will check his weight and provide a general health assessment.

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Grooming your puppy

All puppies should be groomed daily, and not merely to improve skin and coat condition. Grooming helps to teach your puppy to accept being handled; it also enhances the bond between the two of you.

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Keeping your puppy fit

There are so many things you will have learnt about your new puppy when you first brought him home, not the least of which was be his diet. What you choose to feed him will depend on both of you, but bear in mind that a growing puppy needs more calories, minerals, protein and vitamins than a grown up dog.

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Watching your puppy's weight

Did you know that an obese pet is defined as being 15% or more over its ideal weight? That translates into a mere 330 grams for a tiny dog like a Chihuahua, but over 7.5 kilograms for a Rottweiler. Many owners simply don't realise how overweight their pets have become because fat is laid down slowly. Furthermore, they rarely visit their vet to seek help with the problem.

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Keeping your puppy healthy

You're the best person to keep your puppy bouncing with health and vitality. Not only are you responsible for his day-to-day health care, but you're also the person who knows him best of all.

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Caring for your puppy's teeth

Looking after your puppy's pearly whites By three to four weeks of age your puppy’s temporary teeth, or milk teeth, will start to come through. They have 28 milk teeth in total. At around 3-4 months the milk teeth will start to come loose and fall out. They will then be replaced by their permanent teeth. Puppies should lose their milk teeth before their adult teeth emerge.

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Your puppy is becoming an adult

By one year old, your puppy will be an adult dog. He may still act like a mischievous puppy, but his needs will have changed, and now that he's fully-grown, he'll need a grown-up food to provide him with all the nutrients, vitamins and minerals he needs.

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Vaccinating your puppy against diseases

Vaccinating your puppy can help to protect him from several major diseases. The following diseases may sound scary, but if you make sure your puppy gets all the right vaccinations, you won't have to ever worry about them.

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Health problems you can't vaccinate against

Of course, even a vaccinated puppy can still encounter health problems now and again. Here are some you may come up against: In the majority of cases diarrhoea is just a passing inconvenience.

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First Aid

Hopefully your puppy will never seriously hurt himself but, being the high energy bundle that he is, he's bound to get into a few scrapes now and then and it's useful to have knowledge of basic first aid. First Aid Box You should always keep a few basic items on hand for emergencies, such as: cotton bandages, cotton wool or lint to clean wounds, mild pet-friendly antiseptic to wash wounds and a pair of tweezers for removing stings or objects from the mouth.

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